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Iowa/Kansas/Nebraska book
Cover page
Introduction
Sample page
Summary of states represented

Indiana book
Cover page
Introduction
Sample page
Summary of states represented
Summary of cities represented

Illinois book
Cover page
Introduction
Sample page
Summary of states represented
Summary of cities represented


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Review of
Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska Civil War Veterans: Compilation of the Death Rolls of the Departments of Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska, Grand Army of the Republic, 1883-1948

    Dennis Northcott has ably demonstrated the importance of record interdependence in order to retrieve the most biographical information. His series of death rolls of members of the Grand Army of the Republic has proven its merit as a national resource tool. This volume treats the records of 36,000 ex-veterans who died in Iowa, Kansas, and Nebraska between 1883 and 1948. Clearly many of these veterans died prior to the existence of death records so these records may be the only record of such events. Grave markers of Union Civil War veterans often lack dates of death so these death rolls address such shortcomings. For veterans with common names whose places of death are known, these death rolls provide positive identification of their units of service. In addition, veterans who served under aliases can be placed in their proper military units. For those veterans who died between the federal censuses of 1880 and 1900 at unknown localities, these death rolls identify the local post in which the ex-veteran held membership thereby allowing the exploration of other records of the same locality. The data have been presented in as succinct a manner as possible. Northcott in appendix D enumerates the names of the deceased who have obituaries extant at the local post level. The compiled has conducted thorough investigations of the holdings of research libraries to insure that all of the annual reports of the G.A.R. have been included.
Lloyd DeWitt Bockstruck, supervisor of the genealogy section, Dallas Public Library (Dallas, Texas)
 

Review of
Indiana Civil War Veterans: Transcription of the Death Rolls of the Department of Indiana, Grand Army of the Republic, 1882-1948

    The Civil War ranks among the most significant events in American history—impacting the lives and families of so many individuals and the communities in which they lived. The records of veterans' organizations and military reunion groups, often overlooked by researchers, can provide extremely valuable data for genealogists and historians regarding the Civil War. The Grand Army of the Republic is one such organization, and the records of its posts and departments are rich treasure troves of information. This work, Dennis Northcott's latest,  provides one with information from the death rolls of the GAR's Department of Indiana. This carefully abstracted work, providing one with service data, age, and death date when available, as well as GAR post and journal citation for each Union veteran listed, is a must for Civil War researchers. The main text is appropriately complemented with six appendices including one with significant biographical data for select individuals. As veterans often retired to states other than those from which they served, one can find numerous individuals who served in Ohio, Pennsylvania, and other eastern states units in this well-done work. Northcott's Indiana Civil War Veterans is a must-have compilation for libraries, archives, genealogists, historians, and those who are students of this epic war.
Curt Witcher, Historical Genealogy Department Manager, Allen County Public Library (Ft. Wayne, Indiana), and former president of the Federation of Genealogical Societies and the National Genealogical Society
 

Reviews of
Grand Army of the Republic, Department of Illinois
Transcription of the Death Rolls, 1879-1947

    Anyone researching Civil War Union soldiers—especially Illinois soldiers—will be excited about this new resource. The Illinois State Historical Library receives numerous inquiries from genealogists and Civil War historians seeking information about individual soldiers. This index to Illinois G.A.R. members answers several questions quickly and easily, thus saving precious research time and effort. It includes a time period (1879–1916) for which Illinois death dates are difficult to find. The member's death date, combined with the location of his post, may facilitate an obituary search in an appropriate newspaper. This alphabetical list includes Civil War soldiers who enlisted in Illinois, as well as Civil War Union veterans from other states who settled in Illinois after the war. I highly recommend this long-awaited, easy-to-use index for Civil War research.
Jane Ehrenhart, supervisor, reference and technical services, Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library

    Civil War genealogy is one of the most challenging areas to research. Many of us have ancestors who left to fight in the Civil War, and then vanished. We wonder—did he live through the war, or was he buried anonymously in a battlefield ditch along with hundreds of others? The value of Northcott's book is that it compiles names of Civil War veterans living in a very large geographic region—the entire state of Illinois. Among the 32,000 listings are a significant number of men who fought in regiments from Missouri, Ohio, Iowa, Kentucky, and even as far away as Massachusetts and New York. Many of these are men who left and "seemed to vanish without a trace."
    This index was designed to be sufficient unto itself. Though it indexes a rare source found only in a few select libraries, it is not necessary to write to those libraries for additional information. This index provides all the relevant information—month, day and year of death, regiment, last residence, and more. Certainly enough to help genealogists collect the evidence they need to join a Civil War lineage organization.
    Northcott has done the genealogical world a favor by traveling to these special libraries and spending years transcribing this information he's now presenting in this book. In terms of sheer number of names included, it is one of the top Civil War indexes available today.
Marie Concannon, government documents librarian, University of Missouri

    Civil War soldiers from thirty-six states settled in Illinois after the war, joined G.A.R. units, and died in Illinois. Researchers will find this new compilation very helpful in locating the soldier's last G.A.R. post, final city of residence, and date of death. Data was gathered from several sources and has been organized into an interesting and beneficial publication that may lead genealogists to new research possibilities.
Ann Carter Fleming, vice president, National Genealogical Society

    This is a valuable national resource because, while the men belonged to a G.A.R. Illinois post, their military service was from thirty-six states. In addition to Illinois, New York, Pennsylvania, Missouri, Ohio, and Indiana each have over one thousand men listed. This book includes date of death for a time period prior to when most states began requiring death certificates. Highly recommended for genealogists and libraries with military or genealogical collections.
Joyce Loving, manager, special collections, St. Louis County Library

 


Copyright © 2003-2008 Dennis Northcott. All rights reserved.
Please send comments and suggestions to dennis@ngpublications.com.
This page was last updated on 02/25/2008.